Search This Blog

Monday, July 9, 2012

Ration-Era Recipes: "Sugarless" Ice Cream

Ahhh. Ice Cream - one of my favorite things about summer, and in the midst of this heat wave in Central Virginia, I thought it was appropriate to test out a great ration-era ice cream recipe.  (The recipe was taken from Grandma's Wartime Kitchen by Joanne Lamb Hayes which is an incredible compilation of family wartime recipes accompanied by fun facts about cooking with ration restrictions.)  

Last week we hosted our annual WWII day camp for 4th-6th grade students.  This is part of the reason for my lengthy blog silence as I've been working like a mad women to make sure everything was just right for our campers.  But I digress.... One of my favorite aspects of camp is that we serve ration-era snacks to our campers.  Some snacks are a huge hit (think butterscotch cupcakes) and others receive a less than enthusiastic response (oat sticks for instance).  This go round we served Sugarless Berry Ice Cream, and overall, it was well-liked by our young food critics.  The recipe is incredibly simple - although a little labor intensive - but the results were well worth the work.

Basically you take one can of sweetened condensed milk and mix it with a 1/4 cup lemon juice and a pinch of salt.  Next you puree and strain roughly pint of any type of berry (I used strawberries).  Then you fold in the puree into the milk mixture.  Then, whip 1 cup of heavy cream until stiff and fold that into the existing mixture.  Finally, pour the mixture into a freezer-safe container and pop it into the freezer for a couple hours.

The result comes out looking like this:

Yum!

I would recommend allowing the ice cream to thaw for a few minutes before scooping or you just might bend your ice cream scoop.  But this recipe is so simple that you could whip it up in a few minutes, set it aside, and enjoy a delicious frozen treat in the sweltering July heat.

Enjoy!
Megan   

References:
Hayes, J. L. (2000). Grandma's wartime kitchen: World War II and the way we cooked.  St. Martin's Press: New York, NY.

No comments:

Post a Comment